Manterest: The Farmtable

So I built a farm table. Thanks to a design from this lady.  I've wanted to build one for a number of years now for our patio area which means given the heat, moisture, and humidity of H-Town I will enjoy it for 2 years before it rots out. I live for the now.

Stained and whitewashed

Stained and whitewashed

I used pressured treated lumber and General Finishes stain and Outdoor Oil in hopes of extending life. My initial plan was to use a saw horse base. Long story short I have two saw horses now that aren't attached to my table.  

My first attempt at a table top, sans bread boards.

My first attempt at a table top, sans bread boards.

The other mistake I made was using deck boards for my initial top. They just weren't strong enough to hold up to the bending. Ana White's plan calls for a roughly 86 inch length table that is 32 inches wide. Everything is bigger in Texas so my table ended up being about 104 inches by 40 inches. All this to say, Ana White's plans are great and easily customizable. She's got a ton of great ideas. I'm going to build her farmhouse bed for my daughter at some point. I "repurposed" the deck boards for a prep table so nothing has gone to waste.

I initially thought I'd used deck boards for weight but after that didn't work out I moved on to  2x6's and a 2x10 but this sucker is HEAVY. I assembled the table in my garage, disassembled it, loaded it in my truck and reassembled out back. The legs are 4x4's and I really like the look. Sturdy and pragmatic, much like myself.

Rough frame, new bread board

Rough frame, new bread board

What you don't see from the pictures are the angle braces I mounted on the bottom for stability. I also like that look.

I cut everything with a circular saw so it has those classic quirks of a man with the shakes. Derekphi built a similar table in a weekend with the aid of a miter saw so it can be done quicker than my two weeks.

The end caps/bread boards give the table its classic farmhouse look. They really frame it up nice. I don't know why they call them bread boards. My children are equally confused.

I bought a Kreg jig for pocket holes on advice of my friend Darren and that was the greatest purchase I've made since a jean jacket in the 9th grade.  

The one thing I wouldn't skimp on is the stain. General Finishes is the Miami Heat of the stain world. More expensive but worth it. A small can of stain has covered my table, my pallet table, an end table, and two benches. There's plenty left for two end benches I'm building now. The can cost $11 bucks or so. Ad to that milk paint and outdoor oil and finishing will run you $30 bucks. Add that in and with lumber the cost of the table and two benches was less than $130. Not bad.  

I also built benches the one modification was, on the plans the framing is 1x4, and me being husky didn't feel that was enough girth so I went with 2x4's. Four of me could sit on these suckers, though I'd hate to see that.

Framed out benches

Framed out benches

Stained out benches

Stained out benches